Author: Rosemi (page 1 of 4)

Spending wisely

What English sounds like to non-English speakers

Soothing and obnoxious. That’s English in a nutshell.

Working with tracked changes

This video gives a quick overview of how to review your editor’s changes using Microsoft Word.

A sampling of the Bard of Avon

Three steps to immortality:
  1. Skip the clichés.
  2. Use your own words.
  3. Live forever.

Insults we should bring back

There are never enough words for love or hate.

New logo

The talented people at Ingenious Tek Group came up with this beautiful new logo for me. I’d like to especially thank designer Ariel Perez for his creativity, professionalism, and patience in working with me on this logo as well as on countless book cover and website creations for many of my clients.

Note: This is not a sponsored post. This is a post by a happy customer.

Let your child tear book pages

America’s Editor, age 3

With apologies to librarians

Let children read to you.

Let children read in private.

Let children tear the pages of a book in their eagerness to read the story.

Let children drag a book around behind them by a center page as if it were a stuffed animal.

Let children paw the pages and rest their entire body weight on the spine.

Let children feel as if the book is an extension of themselves.

Charlie from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory was supposed to be black

First edition of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Last week Roald Dahl’s widow, Felicity Dahl, revealed in a BBC interview that Charlie from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory was originally a black character.

Mr. Dahl’s biographer, Donald Sturrock, elaborated on this:

“It was his agent who thought it was a bad idea when the book was first published to have a black hero,” Mr. Sturrock said. “She said people would ask why.”

Do I even need to get into the problems with lack of diversity in publishing?

The New York Times offers more details about the BBC interview in this article.

 

Today’s Google Doodle in honor of Samuel Johnson’s birthday made my morning.

He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man.

~Samuel Johnson

The secret life of a book manuscript

Author Thomas E. Ricks recently penned an interesting article in The Atlantic detailing the intricacies of the author–editor relationship as he wrote Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom.

Over our Caesar salads with sliced steak, I asked Scott why he had been so rough on me the previous winter. “Sometimes my job is to be an asshole,” he explained with equanimity. I wasn’t startled at this. At one point on an earlier book, when I told him how stressed I was feeling, he had replied, a bit airily, I thought, “Oh, every good book has at least one nervous breakdown in it.”

Whether you’re familiar with the writing process or not, this piece is a great read.

The next surprise, about three weeks into this process, was coming to realize, over the days of thinking about it, that Scott’s criticisms were spot-on. I saw that if I followed his suggestions and revamped the book, with a new structure that emphasized biography and told the stories of the two men chronologically, the book would be much better. I emailed a note to Scott. “You are right,” it said. This wasn’t so much an apology as the beginning of the next phase of work.

“Only a good writer would be able to say that,” he graciously responded.

You can read the article in its entirety here.

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